Gastronomy Jejunostomy tube insertion

HOW SHOULD I PREPARE FOR THE PROCEDURE?

You will receive instructions from staff at the interventional radiologist's office at least a day before the procedure. Make sure to let the staff know if you have any allergies to medications or to contrast material which may be used during this procedure. If you are on any blood thinners such as aspirin, Coumadin, Lovenox, Heparin, or Plavix please let the staff know. You may have blood drawn for pre-procedure testing at either the hospital or clinic. Staff will advise you if changes in your regular medication schedule are necessary. You will need to fast from midnight on prior to the day of your procedure. Make sure someone will be available to drive you home afterwards.

HOW DOES THE PROCEDURE WORK?

A percutanous gastrostomy tube is inserted through the skin into the stomach. The jejunostomy tube is inserted into the upper portion of the small bowel. These tubes can be left in place to either drain the stomach or small bowel or used as a feeding tube.

HOW IS THE PROCEDURE PREFORMED?

The abdomen will be scrubbed with an antiseptic solution and a sterile drape will then be placed to cover the abdomen. The radiologist will inject local anesthetic (numbing medicine) into the skin where the tube will be placed. You may also receive moderate sedation during the procedure to make you drowsy and remain comfortable. Contrast material will be used to determine the correct placement of the tube. Gastrostomy and Jejunostomy tubes may be recommended for a variety of reasons such as birth defects, defects of the mouth, esophagus or stomach, and patients who cannot swallow correctly. These tubes are also used in patients who are malnourished and cannot maintain their nutrition by taking food by mouth.

WHAT WILL I EXPERIENCE DURING THE PROCEDURE?

During the procedure you will lay on the table in interventional radiology for approximately one hour. Your abdomen will be cleansed with disinfectant and a sterile drape applied over the area. Sedation may be given through your IV. Your blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen level, and respiration will be monitored. A local anesthetic (numbing medicine) will be given into the tissue to numb the site.